A limp-wristed digital documentation of culture's chic, shameless and ridiculous moments.

Search

ADDITIONAL PAGES

Brought to you by...

Tag Results

6 posts tagged new york magazine

L’Afrique, C’est Chic: Musical super-diva Beyonce Knowles has the Black community up in arms over her Fela Kuti-inspired photo spread in the March 2011 issue of L’Officiel. In a couple of shots, she’s photographed in “blackface”—a disrespectful nod to African-Americans on behalf of prejudiced Whites in early 20th-century American culture. Surprisingly (and unfortunately in the year 2011) the European fashion world has taken a sudden interest in “blackface” inspired photo spreads, an issue Robin Givhan documents in an incredible article for New York Magazine.

With so much controversy surrounding race in what some call a “post-racial society” (a term with little meaning), why would Beyonce—an incredibly talented woman dominating a marketplace teeming with the mediocre—resort to an absurd publicity stunt a la Lady Gaga?

Beyonce Knowles on the cover of the March 2011 issue of L’Officiel.

"After once being the best thing that ever happened to porn, the Internet is now wreaking havoc: destroying some fortunes, making bigger ones, and serving as a stimulus plan, in more ways than one." - Benjamin Wallace


utnereader:

laphamsquarterly:

Compare our map of the gangs of old New York, to New York Magazine’s map of gang territories in New York today.

 “A few years ago, you would see kids 19, 20 years old,” says one NYPD veteran who works the gang beat in Harlem. “Now these kids are babies—15, 14—and they are vicious. They will shoot you in a heartbeat and not think twice about it.”

Lapham’s Quarterly excels at reframing issues outside of their historical context. Their piece on gang turf in 1800s New York City dovetails nicely with New York Magazine’s piece on today’s gangs.

(via utnereader)

The hipster moment did not produce artists, but tattoo artists, who gained an entire generation’s arms, sternums, napes, ankles, and lower backs as their canvas. It did not produce photographers, but snapshot and party photographers: Last Night’s Party, Terry Richardson, the Cobra Snake. It did not produce painters, but graphic designers. It did not yield a great literature, but it made good use of fonts. And hipsterism did not make an avant-garde; it made communities of early adopters.

Mark Greif’s musings regarding the hipster movement in an article for New York Magazine.

"Between Paladino, the Bronx tortures, and the suicides, are things really getting better?" - Chris Rovzar

Illustration by Dienstelle 75  for New York Magazine

Loading posts...